Results for: 2000

HDF-EOS

HDF-EOS

The EOS Data and Information System distributes Earth Science Enterprise data through the Distributed Active Archive Centers, the institutions responsible for archiving and making data products readily available to anyone who wants them. Read more

Frozen Soils and the Climate System

Frozen Soils and the Climate System

While scientists have learned to interpret receding glaciers as well as changing trends in snow cover, sea ice extent, and sea level as "indicators" of climate change, they are still working to better understand the role that frozen soils play within the Earth's climate system. Read more

Disintegration of the Ninnis Glacier Tongue

Disintegration of the Ninnis Glacier Tongue

Many processes that shape the Earth's landscape happen too slowly to be witnessed in a human lifetime. But analysis of satellite imagery shows that the large glacier tongue of the Ninnis Glacier on the coast of East Antarctica has disintegrated, changing the shape of the coastline almost overnight. Read more

Earth Observing 1 (EO-1)

Earth Observing 1 (EO-1)

In 2000, NASA launched Earth Observing-1 (EO-1). While flying at an altitude of 705-kilometers, EO-1's primary focus is to test advanced instruments, spacecraft systems, and mission concepts in flight. EO-1 will also return scientific data which is used in comparison with other satellite data to ensure the continuity of land-imaging data. Read more

Reaping What We Sow: Mapping the Urbanization of Farmland Using Satellites and City Lights

Reaping What We Sow: Mapping the Urbanization of Farmland Using Satellites and City Lights

Tracking urbanization, the conversion of rural landscape to urban habitat, has always been difficult due to the speed at which it progresses. Recently, NASA scientists came across a solution. Using satellite images of city lights at night, they constructed a map of urbanized areas and integrated this map with a soil map prepared by the United Nations. These maps indicate that urban centers may be destroying their best soils and putting future generations at risk. Read more

Bright Lights, Big City

Bright Lights, Big City

For the past six years, researchers have been looking for ways to measure the effects of urbanization on biological productivity in countries around the world. To assist them with their research, they have created a method of mapping urbanization on a countrywide scale by using satellite images of the light cities generate at night. Read more

Robert Goddard

Robert Goddard

Robert Goddard developed and test-launched some of the first liquid fueled rockets. Read more

Adapting to Climate Change

Adapting to Climate Change

Teams of scientists and resource planners assess their region’s most critical vulnerabilities in the United States National Assessment on the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. The report covers agricultural productivity, coastal areas, water resources, forests, and human health. Read more

Seeing into the Heart of a Hurricane

Seeing into the Heart of a Hurricane

NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission helps scientist study hurricanes and predict their paths by looking inside the storms. Read more

Mission: Biomes

Mission: Biomes

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to live in a different part of the world? What would the weather be like? What kinds of animals would you see? Which plants live there? By investigating these questions, you are learning about biomes. Read more

Dry Times in North America

Dry Times in North America

Recurring droughts are common in the American West, and a 2008 report from the U.S. Climate Change Science Program cautions that they may become more common (press release). This article from 2000 describes how scientists use data from satellites and rain gauges along with tree-rings and lakebed sediments to understand and predict drought in North America. Read more

Volcanoes and Climate Change

Volcanoes and Climate Change

Volcanic aerosols play a significant role in driving Earth's climate. Read more

Measuring Vegetation (NDVI & EVI)

Measuring Vegetation (NDVI & EVI)

In an effort to monitor major fluctuations in vegetation and understand how they affect the environment scientist use satellite remote sensors to measure and map the density of green vegetation over the Earth. By carefully measuring the wavelengths and intensity of visible and near-infrared light reflected by the land surface back up into space, scientists use an algorithm called a “Vegetation Index” to quantify the concentrations of green leaf vegetation around the globe. Read more

Drought: The Creeping Disaster

Drought: The Creeping Disaster

Though it is a gradual disaster, drought can have devastating effects on agriculture and water supplies, but monitoring and forecasts can allow people to take early actions that prevent harsh impacts later. Read more

Ice and Sky

Ice and Sky

The availability of the Canadian RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data and new algorithms allow the detection of open water in polar ice from space. Read more

The Dirt on Carbon

The Dirt on Carbon

Researchers examine the implications of melting permafrost in the northern forests. Read more

Vilhelm Bjerknes

Vilhelm Bjerknes

Vilhelm Bjerknes is considered by many to be one of the founders of modern meteorology and weather forecasting. Read more

Changing Our Weather One Smokestack at a Time

Changing Our Weather One Smokestack at a Time

Daniel Rosenfeld and a team of scientists from the Hebrew University of Israel recently discovered that aerosol particles from factories and power plants increase the number of droplets in clouds they pollute. In doing so, the pollutants create brighter clouds that retain their water and do not produce rain. Read more

Polynyas, CO2, and Diatoms in the Southern Ocean

Polynyas, CO2, and Diatoms in the Southern Ocean

Climate models predict a dramatic shift in phytoplankton communities that live in the icy waters of the Southern Ocean. Read more

Perspective on Plants

Perspective on Plants

Satellite observations help landowners and land managers monitor the health of their land by providing a larger perspective. Read more

Stars, Clouds, Crops

Stars, Clouds, Crops

Stars' brightness influences planting practices in the Andes. Read more

Tracking Eddies that Feed the Sea

Tracking Eddies that Feed the Sea

Scientists are using sea surface height data collected by satellites to monitor eddies (vortices of water) in the Gulf of Alaska. These eddies are important because they carry nutrients from coastal waters into the open ocean, thereby nourishing the phytoplankton (microscopic plants) that form the base of the ocean food chain. Read more

Shadows of Doubt

Shadows of Doubt

Understanding the complex interplay between clouds and radiation is critical for developing general circulation models that precisely represent the global climate. Read more

Climate Clues in the Ice

Climate Clues in the Ice

Newly available upward-looking sonar shows significant decreases in sea ice thickness in recent decades. Read more

Watching the Sun

Watching the Sun

The Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor III will monitor the sun's total radiation output so scientists can better predict the sun's effect on global climate change. Read more

Flying High for Fine Wine

Flying High for Fine Wine

NASA and Robert Mondavi Winery researchers worked together to use airborne remote sensing technology to classify grapevines and produce better wine. Read more

Illuminating Photosynthesis in the Arabian Sea

Illuminating Photosynthesis in the Arabian Sea

Researchers define an ocean’s seasonal cycle. Read more

Roger Revelle

Roger Revelle

Roger Revelle was one of the world's most articulate spokesmen for science and an early predictor of global warming. Read more

Listening to Raindrops: Using Underwater Microphones to Measure Ocean Rainfall

Listening to Raindrops: Using Underwater Microphones to Measure Ocean Rainfall

Scientists have developed a new method to measure rainfall in the open ocean with underwater microphones. By measuring rainfall over the oceans the scientists will be able to improve global climate models. Read more

Human Impact on the Mojave

Human Impact on the Mojave

Researchers study long-term effects of disturbances to desert ecosystems. Read more

RAMPing Up

RAMPing Up

International teamwork yields a high-resolution map of Antarctica. Read more

Learning To Fly

Learning To Fly

Mission managers had to work through some "exciting" episodes during the launch and initial deployment of NASA’s Terra satellite. Read more

Carbon Conundrum

Carbon Conundrum

Paradoxically, an increase in global temperature may both increase and decrease atmospheric carbon dioxide. The key is timing. Read more

Finding Fossils from Space

Finding Fossils from Space

Satellite imagery helps fossil hunters find dinosaurs in the Gobi Desert. Read more

River Seasons

River Seasons

Remote sensing data help scientists understand large river systems and basin hydrology. Read more

Space-based Observations of the Earth

Space-based Observations of the Earth

With increasingly sophisticated satellite remote sensors, we can measure a wide range of geophysical parameters (such as surface temperature, distribution of clouds and aerosol particles, the abundance of trace gases in the atmosphere, or the distribution and types of life on land and in the ocean) with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. Read more

Grasslands Initiative

Grasslands Initiative

Researchers establish a baseline for understanding net primary productivity: the total amount of carbon plants take out of the atmosphere and use for growth. Read more

Samuel Pierpont Langley

Samuel Pierpont Langley

Samuel Langley was one of America's most accomplished scientists. His work as an astronomy, physics, and aeronautics pioneer was highly regarded by the international science community. Read more

Fire and Ice

Fire and Ice

The eruption of Mt. Pinatubo led to new techniques for detecting short-term climate variation. Read more

On a Clear Day

On a Clear Day

Researchers clarified the issues encountered in modeling clear-sky shortwave radiation by assembling a long-term data set of cloud-free days to test the models. Read more

Growing Data

Growing Data

Researchers use satellite data to characterize the seasonal dynamics of arctic vegetation. Read more

Blanket of Clouds

Blanket of Clouds

Recent studies indicate that clouds absorb significantly more shortwave radiation than previously thought. Read more

Milutin Milankovitch

Milutin Milankovitch

The Serbian astrophysicist Milutin Milankovitch is best known for developing one of the most significant theories relating Earth motions and long-term climate change. He dedicated his career to developing a mathematical theory of climate based on the seasonal and latitudinal variations of solar radiation received by the Earth. Read more

Hurricane Floyd: Fearing the Worst

Hurricane Floyd: Fearing the Worst

In the wake of Hurricane Floyd, polluted runoff threatened North Carolina’s rivers and beaches. Read more

Questioning Convection

Questioning Convection

How well do climate models work? Read more

On Thin Ice

On Thin Ice

Satellite data fill the gaps in shore-based ice observations. Read more

When Rivers of Rock Flow

When Rivers of Rock Flow

Lahars are landslides composed of slurries of volcanic rock, ash, and water, that often occur after eruptions. Read more

Outer Limits

Outer Limits

How does the upper atmosphere influence Earth's climate? Read more

Hurricane Floyd's Lasting Legacy - Introduction

Hurricane Floyd's Lasting Legacy - Introduction

Hurricane Floyd struck eastern North Carolina on September 15, 1999. In it's wake the storm left polluted floodwaters and sediment-choked rivers. Read more

Snow and Ice Extent

Snow and Ice Extent

In December 1998, field support crews had to find a way to locate regions of sea ice dense enough to allow the U.S. Coast Guard ice breaker Polar Star to dock. Read more

Sunspots and the Solar Max

Sunspots and the Solar Max

This fact sheet describes solar phenomenon such as sunspots and the solar wind. Read more

Critical Chemistry

Critical Chemistry

Researchers map ozone's global distribution using data from the Global Tropospheric Experiment. Read more

Second Guessing Mother Nature: Forecasting the Surprise Snow of January 2000

Second Guessing Mother Nature: Forecasting the Surprise Snow of January 2000

Overnight from January 24–25, 2000 residents of Washington, DC were hit with a surprise snowstorm. Despite this misstep, weather forecasts are now more accurate than ever. Read more

Eye on the Sun - Solstice

Eye on the Sun - Solstice

SOLSTICE, an instrument aboard the UARS satellite, created a standard against which future monitoring of the Sun could be measured. Read more

Putting Earthquakes in Their Place

Putting Earthquakes in Their Place

Using modern global databases, hundreds of research reports, satellite photos, and computerized drafting methods, a group of researchers at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center has pieced together what’s considered a series of objective and comprehensive maps (what’s known as a Geological Information System, or GIS) of the planet’s tectonic activity. Read more

Polar Paradox

Polar Paradox

Global warming could lead to another ice age. Read more

Global Temperature Trends - Continued Global Warmth in 1999

Global Temperature Trends - Continued Global Warmth in 1999

Global surface temperatures in 1999 fell back from the record setting high level of 1998, which was the warmest year in the period of instrumental data. Read more

Svante Arrhenius

Svante Arrhenius

Svante Arrhenius was the first person to investigate the effect that doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide would have on global climate. Read more

Upper Crust

Upper Crust

Krill fight for survival as sea ice melts. Read more

Mapping Malaria

Mapping Malaria

For the past fifteen years Don Roberts and a group of scientists at the Uniformed Services University and NASA have been working on a system to pinpoint houses and areas at high risk for the malaria using medical databases of malaria, airplane photographs, and even remote sensing satellites. Read more

Melt-down

Melt-down

The Greenland Ice Sheet is losing ground. Read more

Browse Features by Year
Go Back
1998-2014
Go Forward

World of Change

Satellite images showing how our world— forests, oceans, cities, even the Sun— has changed in recent decades.
Read more

Blue Marble

Composite satellite images of the entire Earth.
Read more

Earth at Night

The night side of Earth twinkles with light in these composite global and regional views.
Read more

Experiments

Hands-on educational activities.
Read more

Visible Earth

A catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet.
Read more

NASA Earth Observations

View, download, and analyze imagery of Earth science data.
Read more

NASA Global Climate Change

Vital signs of the planet.
Read more

Earth Science Picture of the Day

Photos of Earth processes and phenomena.
Read more