Results for: 1999

ACRIMSAT

ACRIMSAT

By measuring the total amount of energy that the sun delivers to the Earth with ACRIMSAT, scientists will be able to build better scientific models of the Earth’s climate system, providing a vital piece of the global climate change puzzle. Read more

Why EOS Matters, 1999

Why EOS Matters, 1999

Nearly a decade ago, ecologist Steve Running described how NASA’s Earth Observing System missions were going to help us answer this crucial question: Is the current human occupancy and activity of planet Earth sustainable? Read more

Introduction to BOREAS

Introduction to BOREAS

BOREAS’ primary goals were to determine how the boreal forest interacts with the atmosphere (via the transfer of gases and energy), how much carbon is stored in the forest ecosystem, how climate change will affect the forest, and how changes in the forest affects weather and climate. Read more

Silvus Borealis

Silvus Borealis

A multi-scale project leads to an understanding of the carbon flux between terrestrial ecosystems and the lower atmosphere. Read more

Eye on the Ocean

Eye on the Ocean

El Niño/Southern Oscillation events have become easier to predict, thanks to the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. Read more

El Nino's Extended Family Introduction

El Nino's Extended Family Introduction

Cyclic patterns in the ocean and atmosphere shape global weather. Read more

A Burning Question

A Burning Question

Evidence suggests that atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning may offset global warming caused by greenhouse gases. Read more

Evolving in the Presence of Fire

Evolving in the Presence of Fire

In the Far North, fire is critical for renewing the boreal forest. But changes in fire frequency or size may convert the forest from a carbon dioxide sink to a source of greenhouse gas emissions. Read more

Global Fire Monitoring

Global Fire Monitoring

Forest fires, brush fires, and slash and burn agriculture—types of biomass burning—are a significant force for environmental change. Fires may play an important role in climate change, emitting both greenhouse gases and smoke particles into the atmosphere. Read more

Fish in the Trees

Fish in the Trees

An international collaboration may lead to accurate assessments of water storage on Amazonian floodplains during rainy seasons. Read more

John Tyndall

John Tyndall

In 1859, John Tyndall's experiments showed that even in small quantities, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone absorbed much more heat than the rest of the atmosphere. Read more

Data in a Flash

Data in a Flash

A new global change research tool detects lightning day and night. Read more

Every Cloud Has a Filthy Lining

Every Cloud Has a Filthy Lining

Sulfur dioxide in the exhaust from ship engines creates bright clouds. Read more

Clouds in a Clear Sky

Clouds in a Clear Sky

Scientists have detected a nearly invisible cloud layer that may explain dryness in the stratosphere. Read more

Visions of a Cloudy Continent

Visions of a Cloudy Continent

A combination of cloud-free satellite imagery and digital elevation data has revealed the face of Antarctica. Read more

Remote Sensing

Remote Sensing

Remote sensing is the science and art of identifying, observing, and measuring an object without coming into direct contact with it. This involves the detection and measurement of radiation of different wavelengths reflected or emitted from distant objects or materials, by which they may be identified and categorized. Read more

Modeling Earth's Land Biosphere

Modeling Earth's Land Biosphere

A NASA-affiliated research team constructed a computer model of the Earth’s terrestrial biosphere that will teach us a great deal about the dynamic interactions between land plants and the lower atmosphere. Read more

Reckoning with Winds

Reckoning with Winds

New wind data reveal typhoon transitions to mid-latitude storms and ocean monsoon breeding grounds. Read more

Introduction to Climate Modeling

Introduction to Climate Modeling

In their ongoing endeavor to understand our planet as a whole system, Earth scientists are increasingly using computer models to help them visualize the causes and effects of climate and environmental change. These models serve as predictive tools that allow scientists to ask “what if...,” and have computers give them answers. Read more

The Color of El Nino

The Color of El Nino

Scientists found a way to detect the end of El Niño and the beginning of La Niña by studying the growth of phytoplankton (tiny marine plants). Read more

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin

Famous for studying lightning by flying a kite in a thunderstorm, American Benjamin Franklin also contributed to early scientific knowledge of weather, climate, and oceanography. Read more

Ozone

Ozone

A relatively unstable molecule that represents a tiny fraction of the atmosphere, ozone is crucial for life on Earth. Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life. Read more

QuikSCAT

QuikSCAT

QuikSCAT provides climatologists, meteorologists and oceanographers with daily, detailed snapshots of the winds swirling above the world’s oceans. Read more

Land Cover Classification

Land Cover Classification

For years scientists across the world have been mapping changes in the landscape (forest to field, grassland to desert, ice to rock) to prevent future disasters, monitor natural resources, and collect information on the environment. While land cover can be observed on the ground or by airplane, the most efficient way to map it is from space. Read more

Floods: Using Satellites to Keep Our Heads Above Water

Floods: Using Satellites to Keep Our Heads Above Water

Scientists are using satellites to spot extreme floods, using the data they collect to create maps of flood risk. Read more

Landsat 7 Fact Sheet

Landsat 7 Fact Sheet

The latest mission in the Landsat series—Landsat 7—continues the flow of global change information to users worldwide. Scientists use Landsat satellites to gather remotely sensed images of the land surface and surrounding coastal regions for global change research, regional environmental change studies and other civil and commercial purposes. Read more

Spotting the Spotted Owl

Spotting the Spotted Owl

With the help of satellite images researchers plan to locate areas where spotted owls are likely to live. The researchers use this information, along with ground surveys, to map out the owl’s habitat and create a method for assessing the health of the owl population in the Pacific Northwest. Read more

Should We Talk About the Weather? Improving Global Forecasts with BOREAS Research

Should We Talk About the Weather? Improving Global Forecasts with BOREAS Research

One goal of of NASA’s Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) is to understand how changes in air temperature, moisture and carbon dioxide levels may impact the boreal ecosystem and what role the boreal forest plays in global-scale climate changes. Read more

90 Degrees N. 1999: NASA Demonstrates New Technology at the North Pole

90 Degrees N. 1999: NASA Demonstrates New Technology at the North Pole

On a recent (April 19–May 2, 1999) trip to the Arctic, NASA personnel chose the North Pole as the site from which to demonstrate how new communications technologies and the Internet now make it possible for scientists working in very remote locations to send and receive data using NASA communications satellites. Read more

Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical and subtropical rainfall through microwave and visible infrared sensors, and includes the first spaceborne rain radar. Read more

Changing Global Cloudiness

Changing Global Cloudiness

Clouds are one of the most obvious and influential features of Earth’s climate system. They are also one of its most variable components. The natural diversity and variability of clouds has intrigued and challenged researchers for centuries. Read more

Changing Global Land Surface

Changing Global Land Surface

Satellite remote sensing enables researchers to consistently monitor distribution and seasonal changes of the world’s vegetation and the exchanges of water and carbon between land vegetation and the atmosphere. These observations will help us understand the rate of change of atmospheric carbon dioxide and its effect on climate. Read more

Mystery of the Missing Carbon

Mystery of the Missing Carbon

Scientists estimate that between 1 and 2 billion metric tons of carbon per year are "missing" from the global carbon budget. In a concerted effort to solve the mystery of the missing carbon, NASA led the interdisciplinary Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) from 1994-97. Read more

La Niña Fact Sheet

La Niña Fact Sheet

The phenomenon known as El Niño is sometimes reverses, leading to strong trade winds, colder than normal water off the coast of Peru, and warmer than normal water near Australia. This cold counterpart to El NiƱo is known as La Niña. Read more

Ocean and Climate Fact Sheet

Ocean and Climate Fact Sheet

The Earth’s ocean and atmosphere are locked in an embrace. As one changes, so does the other. Read more

What is El Nino? Fact Sheet

What is El Nino? Fact Sheet

During an El Niño, the relationships between winds and ocean currents in the Pacific Ocean change, with an impact on weather conditions around the world. Read more

What is a Coccolithophore? Fact Sheet

What is a Coccolithophore? Fact Sheet

Coccolithophores are one-celled marine plants that surround themselves with a microscopic plating made of limestone (calcite). Read more

Polar Ice Fact Sheet

Polar Ice Fact Sheet

Polar ice consists of sea ice, ice sheets, and glaciers. Extending over vast areas of the polar regions, this ice provides some early clues about climate change. Read more

At the Edge: Monitoring Glaciers to Watch Global Warming

At the Edge: Monitoring Glaciers to Watch Global Warming

Alpine glaciers are a good indicator of climate change. If the climate is getting warmer or drier, they will shrink. If it is getting colder or wetter, they tend to grow. Read more

Changing Currents in the Bering Sea

Changing Currents in the Bering Sea

During the summers of 1997 and 1998, a type of one-celled microscopic plant changed the color of the Bering Sea from its natural deep blue to a shimmering aquamarine. These plants, called coccolithophores, present a unique problem for researchers because a massive bloom of the organisms has never before been observed in the Bering Sea. Read more

Clouds & Radiation Fact Sheet

Clouds & Radiation Fact Sheet

The study of clouds, where they occur, and their characteristics, plays a key role in the understanding of climate change. Low, thick clouds reflect solar radiation and cool the Earth's surface. High, thin clouds transmit incoming solar radiation and also trap some of the outgoing infrared radiation emitted by the Earth, warming the surface. Read more

Terra Spacecraft Fact Sheet

Terra Spacecraft Fact Sheet

On December 18, 1999, NASA launched a new flagship, the Terra satellite, to begin collecting a new 18-year global data set on which to base future scientific investigations about our complex home planet. Read more

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World of Change

Satellite images showing how our world— forests, oceans, cities, even the Sun— has changed in recent decades.
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Blue Marble

Composite satellite images of the entire Earth.
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Earth at Night

The night side of Earth twinkles with light in these composite global and regional views.
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Experiments

Hands-on educational activities.
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Visible Earth

A catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet.
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NASA Earth Observations

View, download, and analyze imagery of Earth science data.
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NASA Global Climate Change

Vital signs of the planet.
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Earth Science Picture of the Day

Photos of Earth processes and phenomena.
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